Purslane

Weeding is a big part of gardening, as most of you know, and staying stay ahead requires a routine.  For me, it is at least twice a week.  To my knowledge, none of my fellow gardeners are using herbicides.  They are choosing organic methods: pulling weeds, mulching, or laying down newspaper around vegetable plants to prevent weeds from sprouting.  I have yet to embrace the “newspaper” idea.  Instead, I continue to pull weeds particularly ground crawler-type weeds.

Purslane

Purslane, wrongly identified as a weed.

After talking with Antony, a fellow gardener, I have learned the crawler-type weed is actually Purslane and has a “culinary use.”

Searching the Internet, I have found purslane makes a mat that chokes a lawn and is familiar to most gardeners as common intruder.   It is actually a potherb, and often I have seen it mixed in the fresh salad mixes I have purchased at the opened market, but never knew its name until recently.

As stated in The Rodale Herb Book, “purslane, the herb is a native of India and Africa.” There are many medicinal uses for purslane.  To reword Rodale’s Herb Book, one herbalist would express the juice from the plant, and mix it with sugar or honey and drink it to get rid of a dry cough.  Others have used to reduce inflammations of the eyes it by bruising purslane and then applying the juice externally to the eyes.  This herb has been used for female disorders, healing wounds, to combining with other herbs to treat sufferers of the common cold.

I have added a video of “purslain” growning.  You can view it by clicking on the this link:    Purslain, the new spinach (smile)?   Yes, I am trying to cultivate this herb.

Purslane is more commonly used in salads and soups.  The Greeks use purslane in their fresh salads, or sautéed as a side dish.  In Crete, I have learned purslane is mixed with yogurt as a summer salad.   I have yet to try.   It is a pleasant side dish, and medical researchers have found purslane is five times richer in omega-3 fatty acids than spinach.  Also, it is high in vitamin C.  And just think, I have been adding this weed to my compose.

This creeping, reddish brown plant has taken on an entirely new meaning for me.   The watercress comes to mind when eating purslane alone.  Now that I am cultivating this “weed,”  I intend to sauté it.    Weeding has taken on a different for me.  I wonder how many other plants in my garden are actually edible and nutritional.

(An update:  I have tried to sauté purslane with and without the stems.   Neither works for me.   I prefer purslane in a salad.  Share with me your success with this weed if you have cooked it.)

About Harold McCray

Artist in the kitchen enjoying my three passions: cooking, photography, and writing.
This entry was posted in Gardening and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

20 Responses to Purslane

  1. telecharger
    I have already been looking to submit about something similar to this about my site and you set it up an idea. Many thanks.

  2. thx, will check back soon, have bookmarked you for now.

  3. Wii Remote Looking forward to your next post on Wii

  4. I just added this webpage to my feed reader, excellent stuff. Can not get enough!

    • Please return to read future posts. Thanks for sending me your comment. Let me apologize for the delay in responding to your comments. I mistakenly overlooked a page of comments.

  5. tonie says:

    I think other website proprietors should take this web site as an model – very clean and wonderful style and design, not to mention the content. You’re an expert in this area!

  6. Wonderful blog! I found it while browsing on Yahoo News. Do you have any suggestions on how to get listed in Yahoo News? I’ve been trying for a while but I never seem to get there! Thank you

    • Yahoo News is another feature that I must explore. Once I figured it out, then I will share my finds with you. Would you do the same? Meanwhile, please subscribe to keep me informed and to continue sharing your comments.

  7. Phoebe Amoe says:

    That is the type of info that should be shared around the web. Shame on the search engines for now not positioning this higher up! Come on over and discuss with my web site. Thanks =)

    • I am really quite new to blogging, and gradually I am discovering more about it as I ad new posts, and hear from folks like you. This is on-the-job training for me, so to speak. Any suggestions your can provide me would be greatly appreciated. What is the address for your web site? Thanks for taking the time to comment. I apologize for the delay in getting back to you.

  8. I entirely appreciate this article… Please make another…

  9. Howdy, stumbled upon your web site from a online community I routinely visit, and was wanting to know if I might use your website as a good resource in one of my own sites. All the credit would definitely be provided to the original source, i.e. : http://haroldemccray.com/ArtistInTheKitchen/?p=198 . Would definitely love to be able to, so please make sure to get to me personally at my email address in case I cannot: Braly@gmail.com . Thanks a lot 🙂

    • Braly,

      Thanks for taking the time to message me about my blog. By all means please use what wish regarding the contents of my blog. Yes, I would appreciate the credit. Please share with me your site. I like to see what you are blogging. Again, thanks for the message.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *